Perfect Peach Pie with Lattice Crust

peach pie with lattice crust on ZoeBakes. Photo by Zoe Francois

When the peach season is a good one, and this year it is spectacular, it is best to keep peach pie simple. There is nothing more beautiful than a perfectly ripe, juicy, smooth, sweet peach, so don’t fuss it all up with too much extra stuff. This perfect peach pie with lattice crust is really just peaches, a touch of booze, which is optional and some raw sugar (use brown sugar if you don’t stock raw). The trick is binding the peaches enough to keep them together in a neat slice, without adding so much starch that is gets gloppy. This is an art, rather than a science (that’s only partially true), because each batch of peaches produces a different amount of juice. I tend to go on the under-bound edge of the spectrum, so keep that in mind when you are making your filling.

If you happen to get your hands on a bunch of peaches and you want to make more than one pie, you can make the pie, freeze it and bake it later in the summer or even save it (if you have a really good freezer) for chillier weather, when you are desperate to remember the taste of summer.

You can watch me make this perfect peach pie with lattice crust and I give more details on freezing a pie in my instagram videos.

peach pie with lattice crust on ZoeBakes. Photo by Zoe Francois

peach pie with lattice crust on ZoeBakes. Photo by Zoe Francois

Perfect Peach Pie with Lattice Crust

1 recipe pie dough

8 ripe peaches, peeled, pitted and sliced (you can watch me peel the peach in my instagram video) – I also made this pie using a combination of peaches and apricots. I used 7 peaches and 5 apricots, since they are so small, otherwise the process is exactly the same. 

1/2 cup raw sugar

1/4 cup whiskey, bourbon or rum (if you don’t want to use alcohol, you can substitute 2 tablespoons lemon juice)

Pinch salt

4-5 tablespoons cornstarch

Egg wash

Sugar for sprinkling

Prepare pie dough

To make the filling:

Put the peaches, sugar, whiskey, and salt in a big bowl and let them sit for at least 30 minutes, but longer is better. This releases the juices from the peaches. Strain the peaches and mix the juices with the cornstarch. In a saucepan, cook the cornstarch mixture until it is thick and translucent. Add the thickened juices back to the peaches in a large bowl.

Roll out the pie dough and put it in a 9 Inch Pie Dish. Fill with peaches and create the lattice top. You will find a video on the lattice pie crust on my instagram videos.

To freeze the pie:

Place it in the freezer until completely chilled, then wrap well in plastic and return to freezer until ready to bake.

To bake the pie:

Preheat oven to 425°F

Brush top of pie with egg wash and sprinkle with sugar.

Bake on a baking sheet (in case the juices runneth over). If the pie was frozen, it goes into the oven frozen, don’t defrost, it will just take much longer to bake and you will probably need to tent the crust, see my instagram video).

After 30 minutes, drop the temperature to 350 and continue baking until the filling is bubbling and clear. This can take anywhere from 45 additional minutes to 1 1/2 hours (if it was frozen) and you may need to tent the edge of the pie if it starts to brown before the middle is done.

Cool completely before slicing or the filling will be sloppy; tasty, but sloppy.

Ice cream is not a must, but a strong suggestion!

My Apricot Peach Pie for breakfast with a cup of coffee.

13 thoughts to “Perfect Peach Pie with Lattice Crust”

  1. This is the most beautiful pie I have ever seen. It is literally perfection! And I come from a pie-making family, so I am not new:o) Kudos!

  2. This pie looks wonderful! I am planning on making it this weekend. One quick question, is there any concern with putting a ceramic dish that has been in the freezer right into a 425 degree oven? I was taught to be careful with extreme temperature differences like this, but it seems like it might be ok here? I also have an EH pie dish.

    Thank you!

  3. Looks stunning! Would you always recommend cooking the juices with cornstarch first? I’m planning to make a rhubarb pie and a cherry pie next week and was wondering if that would make sense for those as well…

    1. Hi Lisa,

      If you have fruit that produces lots of juice (like berries or super ripe stone fruit), it is often helpful to bind them before baking.

      Thanks, Zoë

  4. Well, it took me all day, and I need lots more practice to get the butter cut in just right (my butter chunks were too large and I had to knead them in by hand before re-rolling), but the pie was beautiful and really delicious. Even with all the handling, the crust was still tender, which surprised me. This will be my go-to pie recipe!!

    1. Very delicious pie filling! I was worried bourbon would overpower but it didn’t. It was just right. Definitely a keeper!

  5. I made this pie and it was the most delicious peach pie I’ve ever tasted. Cooking the juices with cornstarch really held the filling together and gave it so much flavor.

    I did notice that the pie crust expanded a lot. I’ve never had that happen before. Any thoughts on what I could have done wrong? Still came out great but maybe not as pretty as I was hoping.

    1. Hi Emery,

      So glad you enjoyed the pie!

      If you have large pieces of butter in the dough, they create steam and expand the dough. This makes the dough super flaky, but it does mean that it may not keep the shape quite as much. If you want to make sure the crust keeps it’s shape you’ll want to work the butter into the dough a little more, but it won’t be as flaky.

      Enjoy, Zoë

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