5 from 2 votes

Chocolate Macarons

Chocolate macarons | ZoëBakes photo by Zoë François

These chocolate macarons are bit of a contradiction. They are both light, as a macaron should be and fudge-y, like a brownie. The chocolate macaron shells are made with cocoa powder and then they’re filled with a chocolate ganache, so they’re super deep chocolate fantastic flavor.

The technique is the same as my other macaron recipe, so you can follow those instructions, but the baking times can be a bit tricky, so see my suggestions for baking in the recipe. I like to finish the macarons with a dusting of really nice cocoa powder, for both the velvety look and the extra intense chocolate hit.

Chocolate macarons | ZoëBakes photo by Zoë François
Chocolate macarons | ZoëBakes photo by Zoë François
Chocolate macarons | ZoëBakes photo by Zoë François
Chocolate macarons | ZoëBakes photo by Zoë François
Chocolate macarons | ZoeBakes photo by Zoë François

Chocolate Macarons

These chocolate macarons are both light, as a macaron should be and fudge-y, like a brownie. The chocolate macaron shells are made with cocoa powder and then they’re filled with a chocolate ganache, so they’re super deep chocolate fantastic flavor.
5 from 2 votes
Active Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours
Course: cookies
Cuisine: Dessert
Servings: 40 sandwich cookies

Equipment

  • Food processor
  • Pastry bag
  • Round tip

Ingredients

Ganache

  • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 4 oz chocolate finely chopped

Macarons

Instructions

Ganache

  • First, make the ganache for the filling. Heat the cream to a simmer in a saucepan. Turn off the heat and add the chocolate, swirl the cream until it covers the chocolate and allow to sit for 3 minutes, then gently whisk until smooth. If the ganache separates, whisk in a bit more cream until it comes together. Place in a bowl covered with plastic wrap and allow to come to room temperature while you make the macarons.

Macarons

  • In a food processor, pulse together the almond meal, cocoa powder and the confectioners’ sugar until it is well mixed and very fine. You may need to scrape down the sides.
  • In a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, beat the egg whites until they are foamy. Sprinkle the sugar over them in a steady stream and then turn up the speed and beat the whites until you’ve reached stiff peaks.
  • In three additions you will now fold in the almond meal mixture. Use a rubber spatula to fold them in. Once you have repeated this two more times with the remaining almond mixture, your batter will be quite thick. Here is a fail safe way of knowing when your batter is ready. First press it up on the side of the bowl, and it will cling onto the sides without slumping into the middle. You want to continue folding the batter and repeat testing it on the side of the bowl, until it slumps down when you press it onto the sides of the bowl. Then you are ready to pipe.
  • Using a Pastry Bag, fitted with a Round Tip, pipe the batter onto a flat baking sheet lined with a piece of parchment paper. Once you have piped out a full tray, you will bang the tray on the counter to work out some of the bubbles and flatten the macarons. Repeat with another tray until all of the batter is used up. Let them sit at room temperature until the tops are dry to the touch, about 30 minutes, but it will depend on the environment. While you are waiting, preheat your oven to 330°F.
  • Bake the trays one at a time for 11 minutes** (see note below). If they are not set, then rotate the tray and bake for an additional 2 to 3 minutes. This may be slightly different depending on your oven. Let them cool before filling.
  • Fill the cooled macaron shells with the ganache. Refrigerate for at least an hour before dusting with cocoa powder and serving.

Notes

*I use Valrhona Cocoa Powder for flavor and color
**This is based on a different recipe. The chocolate macarons may take a minute or two longer to bake. To experiment with the baking time, I suggest you pipe one or two shells onto a small piece of parchment and bake them off alone, so that if you over bake them, you are only sacrificing one or two shells.
Precision is the key to successful macarons, so I suggest weighing all of your ingredients for the macarons instead of using cup measures.
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

The winner of the Bake From Scratch book is Vern! Congratulations!

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4 thoughts to “Chocolate Macarons”

  1. Thank you Zoe, for your beautiful macaron recipes and wonderful instructions. I have 2 questions for you. Is it possible to divide a macaron recipe and use 2 different colors (not chocolate of course), or would it be best to just do separate batches? Seems like a lot of cookies!
    And, is it possible to use organic dark cacao powder in place of cocoa? Any suggestions other than Valrhona?

    1. Hi Wendy,

      You can divide the batter and tint them different colors.

      You can use whatever cocoa powder you prefer.

      Enjoy, Zoë

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