5 from 3 votes

Swedish Cream

Host Zoe Francois' Swedish creme with lingonberry jam, raspberries and krumkake, as seen on Zoe Bakes, season 2.

This is the Swedish cream recipe I made in the Nordic Treats episode of Zoë Bakes on Magnolia Network where I pay tribute to my Nordic heritage by preparing Swedish cream and krumkake, a pressed cookie and visiting a ladies’ church group for a lesson in making the traditional Norwegian flatbread, lefse. I also prepare sour cherry streusel bars because you can’t attend a gathering in Minnesota without bringing something to share!

Host Zoe Francois' Swedish creme with lingonberry jam, raspberries and krumkake, as seen on Zoe Bakes, season 2.
Swedish Crème and Berries with Krumkake
Host Zoe Francois' Swedish creme with lingonberry jam, raspberries and krumkake, as seen on Zoe Bakes, season 2.
Host Zoe Francois' Swedish creme with lingonberry jam, raspberries and krumkake, as seen on Zoe Bakes, season 2.

Swedish Cream

5 from 3 votes
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours 20 minutes
Course: Desserts

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 tsp (1 envelope) unflavored gelatin
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • 1 cup (200g) granulated sugar
  • 1 vanilla bean scraped
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 2 cups sour cream
  • Lingonberry jam for serving
  • Fresh raspberries for serving

Instructions

  • Bloom the gelatin in cold milk.
  • In a saucepan, bring the heavy whipping cream, sugar, vanilla seeds and lemon zest to a simmer. Whisk in the bloomed gelatin until smooth. Remove from heat and add the sour cream. 
  • Pour into individual molds and allow to set in the refrigerator for at least 3 hours, it may take longer if you’re using bigger molds. 
  • To invert them, dip the base of the molds in hot water to help release it onto a serving plate. Serve with a dollop of lingonberry jam and fresh raspberries. 
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Share this post

3 thoughts to “Swedish Cream”

  1. Zoe- I really enjoy watching your show! I am Norwegian and have been in training all my life for most Norwegian difficult cookies and lefse. I watched the lefse episode. One of the reasons we “chill” the potatoes is to let the water/moisture come out of the potatoes. If the potatoes are too wet then people tend to add more flour thus making the lefse tough and it tastes more like flour that the soft delicate taste it otherwise has. If the potatoes have been irrigated they have a lot of moisture and not as much flavor to counter act that I sometimes add the golden Yukon to get the buttery flavor and might add a little russet to help decrease the moisture. I’ve also chilled them with a few paper towels on top. You are lucky to live where the soul is so rich! The potatoes make all the difference! have a great day!

    We use an electric krumkake iron that has 2 cookies at a time. We have 2 people make them so one pours into the krumkake maker and then we have a roller

  2. My favorite episode so far Zoe!! What a delight to see you share your heritage journey with your dad! Love you and your gifts! Thank you for sharing with us!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Recipe Rating