Strawberry-Rhubarb Crisp

Strawberry-Rhubarb Crisp Recipe | ZoëBakes | Photo by Zoë François

This is a strawberry-rhubarb crisp I created for my Cooking Channel Weekend Baking post. There is really nothing better than the combo of sweet berries and tart rhubarb. If you are one who has never tasted rhubarb, or tried and decided it is not your thing, I beg you to try it again. Maybe you won’t want to grab a stalk out of the garden and plunge it, raw, into a jar of sugar. That is a more advanced move. The trick is to start gradually, combine it with lots of strawberries and a sweet crunchy crisp. This is not cheating, the rhubarb is still playing an essential role in the flavor of your crisp. It is adding a tart dimension to a potentially overly sweet dessert;  like adding lemon zest to balance sweetness, but it is even more interesting. Pretty soon you will have a rhubarb plant growing in your yard and long for the first stalks to poke out from the spring snow and then dread the last days, when the heat of summer has made the plant too tough to eat. That is why I make this plea now, when rhubarb is at its best!

Strawberry-Rhubarb Crisp

1 pound fresh or frozen strawberries, cut into slices

6 cups rhubarb cut into ½-inch slices

1 cup sugar

1/3 cup cornstarch

1 teaspoon lemon zest

½ teaspoon freshly grated ginger (or ¾ teaspoon ground)

 

Crisp topping:

2/3 cup all-purpose flour

2/3 cup brown sugar, well packed

2/3 cup old fashioned rolled oats

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

¼ teaspoon ground ginger

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Preheat oven to 350°F.

In a large bowl, toss together the strawberries, rhubarb, sugar, cornstarch, zest, and ginger.  Place the mixture in a shallow 8-cup baking dish.  Loosely cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes.

While the fruit mixture is baking make the crisp topping. In a medium sized bowl, mix together the flour, brown sugar, oats, salt, cinnamon, ginger, and butter, until the butter is distributed evenly.

After the fruit has baked for 30 minutes, remove the foil and cover with the crisp topping. Return to the oven and bake, uncovered, for an additional 30 minutes.

Strawberry-Rhubarb Crisp Recipe | ZoëBakes | Photo by Zoë François

Serve at any temperature with ice cream as dessert or even a dollop of yogurt as breakfast.

Strawberry-Rhubarb Crisp
Author: 
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: Crisp
 
Ingredients
  • 1 pound fresh or frozen strawberries, cut into slices
  • 6 cups rhubarb cut into ½-inch slices
  • 1 cup sugar
  • ⅓ cup cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • ½ teaspoon freshly grated ginger (or ¾ teaspoon ground)
  • Crisp topping:
  • ⅔ cup all-purpose flour
  • ⅔ cup brown sugar, well packed
  • ⅔ cup old fashioned rolled oats
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. In a large bowl, toss together the strawberries, rhubarb, sugar, cornstarch, zest, and ginger. Place the mixture in a shallow 8-cup baking dish. Loosely cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes.
  2. While the fruit mixture is baking make the crisp topping. In a medium sized bowl, mix together the flour, brown sugar, oats, salt, cinnamon, ginger, and butter, until the butter is distributed evenly.
  3. After the fruit has baked for 30 minutes, remove the foil and cover with the crisp topping. Return to the oven and bake, uncovered, for an additional 30 minutes.
  4. Serve at any temperature with ice cream as dessert or even a dollop of yogurt as breakfast.

 

Enjoy this simply wonderful strawberry-rhubarb crisp recipe I created for Cooking Channel and check out my other crisp recipes while you’re at it!

10 thoughts to “Strawberry-Rhubarb Crisp”

  1. Hi Zoe! really love your blog site…and the pics that come with the articles. OMG, I drool everytime you have a new post. Anyway, been wanting to try this strawberry rhubarb desserts, but can’t seem to find rhubarb in my neighborhood. What’s the difference between a swiss chard and rhubarb? They seem to look alike but not sure if it’s the same. And I would love to try this recipe soon. Please enlighten me…

    Thanks,
    Mari

    1. Hi Mari,

      With rhubarb you only eat the stalks, the leaves are actually poisonous. The rhubarb stalks break down to be very soft. Swiss chard you eat the leaves and the stalks are pretty tough, it also lacks the tartness that rhubarb has. Swiss chard would be wonderful in a savory tart.

      Thanks, Zoë

  2. Hi Zoe,
    I’m from France and when I was little my grandma would always make rhubarb pie. No strawberries! It had a sweet crust, a custard bed, the rhubarb, and then she would sprinkle some sugar on top to counterbalance the tartness just a little. It was delicious! Sadly she passed away without sharing the recipe. If you ever come across something like this, please share it with us! She also made rhubarb compote (“Rhubarb sauce” in essence, like applesauce) that we ate like a dessert. But we never did eat it raw dipped in sugar! Now I wish I had tried this. I’m in Florida now and I don’t even know if rhubarb grows down here. Off to look it up!
    Thanks for the blog, it’s one of my faves (and your Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes book too!)

    1. Hi Nathalie,

      A friend and I were just talking about that very tart. He said it is his very favorite thing to eat when he travels to Paris. I will try to make one like it and post about it!

      Thanks, Zoë

  3. Hi Zoe,

    thanks for letting me know the difference. I will surely look for the rhubarb intensely at the grocery stores I go to. BTW, lately you’ve been posting recipes and techniques for the cooking channel…do you have a show on said channel?

    thanks again.
    Mari

    1. Hi Matt,

      I have added the recipe. It was originally just a link to the one I did for Cooking Channel! Now it lives in both spots.

      Thanks, Zoë

  4. As children we picked stalks of rhubarb and dipped it in sugar. I need to find some rhubarb – my sons have never tasted it . Now my husband says he’s never had it either. Guess what I’ll be making soon? Thank you

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